Learn How To Interact With People With Disabilities

New York We Buy Houses

Learn How To Interact With People With Disabilities

A common misconception is to avoid a conversation with a person with disability fearing they might get offended when we ask questions about their condition or that there won’t be a common topic to talk about. It’s often awkwardness that makes most of us turn away from starting a conversation at all.

There are likely different reasons some people feel awkward or uncomfortable around disabled individuals. Some would assume that those with a handicap are bitter about their condition or that they may say the wrong thing if they try to talk to them.

“I think it’s human nature to be curious. And I don’t think anyone should feel bad about that,” he says. “If you ask most disabled people a question, they’re not going to mind,” says Alex Brooker, co-host of a Friday-night talk show The Last Leg.

What You Need To Realize

New York We Buy Houses SellAnyHouse NYC, a real estate agency based in New York City, has a soft spot for families with a family member who is handicapped or disabled. Because not all people have the patience and the interest to know how to properly interact with persons with disabilities; in New York, we buy houses from households who want to move to a community that is more welcoming to a person with special needs.

It doesn’t have to be a frustrating experience for these families. We can help make it easier for people with special needs or with a medical condition to settle in our community by understanding three things.

#1 It’s alright to ask questions. Open communication will help others understand what disability is like for families experiencing it. When you meet someone who is in a wheelchair, who can’t walk without a walking aid, use polite words to ask them about their condition.

It is not an intrusion of privacy. It is education and awareness. The more you know about the condition, you’d be more comfortable the next time to talk to the person or anyone with a similar condition. Read about Jamie Davis Smith’s blog about her daughter with special needs.

#2 Some disabilities are not visible. The persons with disabilities (PWD) icon is often a man in a wheelchair or an empty wheelchair. People can easily spot one with physical difficulty when they are using a wheelchair or a cane, in the case for blind people. But there are people that show no physical sign.

A seemingly well growing child may seem spoiled when the mother can’t control the child’s tantrum. What you didn’t know is the child may have autism or a global developmental delay. It isn’t just children who have this condition, adults too. It’s important that we give our understanding instead of judging looks. We buy houses in NYC with the home seller’s best interest in mind.

#3 Ask if you can offer help. If a handicapped co-worker looking like he is having a hard time getting coffee, ask first if you can lend a hand. At first glance, it may seem uncomfortable but bear in mind that their daily routine is different from yours but they are managing, and they have ways to get things done.

By asking if they need help, it’s a form of respect to how capable they can be despite their condition.

How Can You Help?

In New York, we buy houses in all types and forms, even a house that has been modified to cater to a disabled family member. Regardless of the condition, location, house value, or equity; if the need to sell is immediate, we do not hesitate to put forth an all cash offer that is guaranteed fair.

Our services aren’t limited to such circumstances though. We have a team of real estate consultants ready to share valuable information about practical solutions to the most common housing problems. If you know someone who is in a rush to sell their property to better care for a family member’s special needs, contact us! We will help!

The post Learn How To Interact With People With Disabilities appeared first on We Buy Houses In New York City, NY | SellAnyHouse.com.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s